Visit HarpWeek.com
Go to the homepage...

On the Antietam // The Fourteenth at Gettysburg // Tippoo Saib // Buried Alive

Harper's Weekly Text
May 7, 1864, p. 302 (1-2)

Synopsis

A freed slave who joined the Union army describes the skirmish at Fort Pillow.  After a brave fight, the Union troops were overrun at the fort and the Confederate soldiers began killing everyone in sight.  Many ran down to the river to hide, but most were found and killed or severely wounded.  Though a few escaped, the freed slave was not one of the luckiest few.  Instead, he was wounded and tossed, still alive, into a mass grave.  Eventually, the freed slave managed to disentangle himself from the corpses and climb to the open air, where he lost consciousness.  When he awoke, he was in a hospital where one of his comrades had just died.  Concluding his account, the freed slave says that he hopes to be well soon so that he can return to battle with renewed vigor.


Additional Material Relevant to "Buried Alive"

Historical Background:

"The Massacre at Fort Pillow"
April 30, 1864, p. 283 (4)

Military Background:

"General N.B. Forrest"
February 18, 1865, p. 109 (3-4)

Illustrations:
Portrait of Nathan Bedford Forrest
February 18, 1865,  p. 109

Commentary:

"Retaliation"
April 30, 1864, p. 274

Illustrations:

"The Massacre at Fort Pillow"
April 30, 1864, p. 284 (1-4)

"Rebel Atrocities"
May 21, 1864, pp. 328 (1) Ė 329 (4)

"This is a White Manís Government"
September 5, 1868, p. 568 (1-4)

 


 
 
Go to the homepage...

On the Antietam // The Fourteenth at Gettysburg // Tippoo Saib // Buried Alive

     
 

 
     
 

 
     
 

 

Website design © 2001-2004 HarpWeek, LLC & Ampersand Graphic Design, Inc.
All Content © 1998-2004 HarpWeek, LLC
Please submit questions to webmaster@harpweek.com