A Sampler of Civil War Literature
»Women as Principal Characters

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The Black-Eyed Smuggler (25)
Harper's Weekly, May 14, 1864
 
Synopsis of "The Black-Eyed Smuggler"
An army soldier tells the story of his encounter with a female smuggler in Tennessee. While riding with a party of men, the soldiers met a dark-eyed woman riding on a mule. She pulled out a pistol, and demanded a horse, but the men laughed at her and continued on their way. Later, the narrator realized that the woman could be dangerous, so he asked his captain for a party to go search for her. They found her and arrested her. She admitted that she was a smuggler, and that she had been smuggling supplies through the lines for the Confederate troops. She was also suspected of spying. Her husband was at the fort where she was being held, but he refused to see her and left her to face her punishment on her own. He also took their children from her, so that they would be taught to respect the Union. The woman was sent to prison, and her mule is now being used to haul wood for the fort.
 
"The Black-Eyed Smuggler" Story from Harper's Weekly
The Black-Eyed Smuggler
Harper's Weekly, May 14, 1864, page 315 (3-4)
 
Additional Material Relevant to "The Black-Eyed Smuggler"
 
Historical Background
Memphis, Tennessee
Harper's Weekly, March 15, 1862, page 162 (1)
 
Military Background
Memphis Under the Stars and Stripes
Harper's Weekly, July 5, 1862, page 423 (4)
 
Commentary
Pardon of Mrs. Hutchins
Harper's Weekly, January 7, 1865, page 2 (4)
 
Illustrations
 


How to Deal with Female Traitors
Harper's Weekly, October 12, 1861, page 656 (1-4)

 


Memphis (Tennessee) Before the War
Harper's Weekly, March 15, 1862, page 168 (1-4)

 


General Stuart’s New Aid
Harper's Weekly, April 4, 1863, page 211 (3-4)

 

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